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Geography

 

 

At Holy Family, we teach Geography according to the National Curriculum.

We believe that high-quality teaching of geography should inspire in children a curiosity and fascination about the world and its inhabitants that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. In order to achieve this, we strive to ensure that our approach to teaching Geography enables all children to develop their contextual knowledge as well as a competence in geographical skills.

 

In Key Stage 1 children focus on developing their knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their own locality - they learn to locate the seven continents and five oceans while studying about the countries of the United Kingdom and their capital cities. Children develop their knowledge of the human and physical geography of the United Kingdom.

 

When children move to Key Stage 2, their learning extends beyond the local area and they develop their knowledge and understanding of the United Kingdom, Europe, as well as North and South America. Their learning at this stage focuses in the environmental, physical and human features of regions, countries and major cities.

 

Teachers at Holy Family strive to ensure that learning Geography is always involving and fun. We also believe that fieldwork is at the core of geographical investigation, so we make sure that children are given the opportunity to apply their knowledge to observe and record their findings about features studied.

Throughout the school, we ensure that children are encouraged to ask and answer questions about the natural and human world. By providing a stimulating and rich Geography curriculum for all Key Stages we promote the development of knowledge of places and environments on a local, national and global scale. This is supported by our termly ‘Around the World’ Days, during these days all of the children learn about a different country or region of the world thorough a variety of engaging and challenging activities. Their work is recorded in their ‘Around the World’ books which will follow them throughout the school to demonstrate the progress they have made in geography in their time at Holy Family.

 

 

Year Group:

Autumn Term:

Spring Term:

Summer Term:

1

 

 

 

2

Famous London Landmarks

What a Wonderful World

Beside the Sea Side

3

Land Use

Extreme Earth

Rainforests

4

Wonderful Water

Somewhere to Settle

All Around the World

5

Marvellous Maps

Exploring Eastern Europe

Enough for Everyone

6

Raging Rivers

The Amazing Americas

Locational Knowledge of world countries

 

Year 1:

Content to follow

 

Year 2:

 

Famous London Landmarks:

To find out about the location of London,

To locate a variety of landmarks in London,

To begin to use maps to locate landmarks,

To know that London is the capital city of London.

 

What a Wonderful World:

To name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans;

To use world maps, atlas and globes to identify the UK and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans.

To understand the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the equator and North and South Pole.

To use aerial photographs to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features.

To use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical and human features.

 

Beside the Seaside:

To use basic geographical vocabulary, in the context of coastal/seaside locations,

To use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to human and physical features, in the context of coastal/seaside locations,

To use aerial photographs and to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features, in the context of coastal/seaside locations,

To name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the UK, in the context of the seaside resorts in the four countries of the UK,

To use simple compass directions and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map,

To use simple fieldwork and observational skills.

 

Year 3:

 

Land Use:

To describe and understand key aspects of human geography including land use in the context of using sketch maps.

To use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps in the context of drawing a sketch map.

To describe and understand key aspects of human geography including land use in the context of using keys and legends.

To use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human features in the local area

To use maps and atlases to describe land use in the context of thinking about urban and rural areas.

To use maps and atlases to describe land use in the context of thinking about agriculture.

 

Extreme Earth:

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography in the context of what is under the Earth’s surface.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography in the context of volcanoes.

To explain how volcanoes are formed

To explain how volcanoes affect people’s lives.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography in the context of earthquakes.

To explain what causes earthquakes and how they are measured.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography in the context of tsunamis.

 

Rainforests:

To locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and

South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities in the context of rainforests.

To identify areas of the world containing rainforests.

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the

context of rainforests.

To identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night) in the context of rainforests.

To identify areas of the world containing rainforests.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle in the context of a tropical climate.

To describe the key aspects of a tropical climate.

To describe and understand the features of the layers of a rainforest.

To describe the animals and plants living in the rainforest.

To compare the Amazon rainforest and Sherwood Forest.

To explain the effects humans are having on the rainforests.

 

Year 4:

 

Wonderful Water:

To describe and understand key aspects of the water cycle in the context of learning about the changing states of matter.

To explain the three states of matter.

To describe and understand key aspects of the water cycle in the context of explaining the water cycle.

To explain how clouds and rain are formed.

To describe and understand key aspects of the water cycle in the context of learning about the water treating process.

To explain how and why drinking water is cleaned.

To describe and understand key aspects of the water cycle in the context of learning about water pollution.

To understand the causes and effects of water pollution.

 

Somewhere to Settle:

To describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water in the context of the needs of early settlers.

To explain why settlements develop in certain locations.

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the context of the origins of settlements.

To use maps to identify settlements built by invaders.

To compare land use in different settlements.

To use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world in the context of identifying links between settlements.

To create a map of a settlement.

 

All Around the World:

To identify the position and significance of the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere in the context of researching countries in different hemispheres.

To identify the position and significance of latitude and longitude in the context of using co-ordinates to read maps.

To use longitude and latitude to find places on maps, atlases and globes.

To identify the position and significance of the Arctic and the Antarctic Circle in the context of comparing Polar Regions to the UK.

To describe the key features of the Polar Regions and compare them to the UK.

To identify the position and significance of the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn by comparing the climate of the tropics with that of the UK.

To identify the position and significance of the Prime/Greenwich Meridian by exploring countries on the Meridian Line.

To identify the position and significance of time zones (including day and night) by comparing times in different countries.

 

Year 5:

 

Marvellous Maps:

To locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America by using an atlas.

To find countries in Europe and North and South America on a map.

To name and locate cities of the UK and their identifying human and physical characteristics by using an atlas.

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied by using

the index and co-ordinates.

To use symbols and a key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world by identifying landmarks shown on an Ordnance Survey map.

To use the eight points of a compass to build knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world by describing routes on a map.

To use four and six-figure grid references to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world by finding features on a map.

To plan a journey using the eight compass points and four or six-figure grid references.

To describe how land use has changed over time.

 

Exploring Eastern Europe:

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the context of European countries.

To identify the countries of Europe.

To identify the capital city of a country.

To compare features of eastern European landscapes with my own area.

To compare the climate of eastern European regions with that of my own area.

To compare the human geography of eastern European regions with that of my own area.

To explain the impact of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

 

Magnificent Mountains:

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the context of mountain ranges.

To use a map to find countries and their key features.

To locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South

America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major

cities in the context of mountain ranges.

To locate key mountain ranges of the world.

To name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers) in the context of hills and mountain ranges.

To locate key areas of higher ground in the UK.

To use a map to find and describe key features of mountains.

To explain how different types of mountains are formed.

To describe a mountainous climate.

To describe how tourism affects mountain regions

 

Year 6:

 

Raging Rivers:

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle in the context of the water cycle.

To name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and landuse patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time in the context of rivers

To locate the key rivers of the UK.

To locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities in the context of rivers of the world.

To locate the key rivers of the world.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle in the context of features of rivers.

To describe the key features of a river system.

To use atlases and maps to identify the key features of a river system.

To describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water in the context of rivers

To explain the impact of damming rivers.

 

Amazing Americas:

To use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied in the context of North and South America.

To locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities in the context of places in North and South America.

To use geographical terminology to describe the location and characteristics of a range of places across the Americas.

To describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle in the context of comparing how weather and climate across America is affected by geographical location.

To use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, to identify human and physical features of the local area.

To identify similarities and differences in the human and physical geography of my local area and a region of North America.

To know the names and locations of the ancient and new wonders of the world.

To describe the characteristics and significance of a natural wonder of the Americas.

 

 

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